Latin America & Caribbean

Propaganda

Summer Institute for k-12 Teachers

June 22 - 24, 2020

**NOTE: The dates and logistics for this event are subject to possible change, depending on the course of the current COVID 19 pandemic. If you are interested in this event, sign up and you will get updates as the situation develops.**

People Power

Summer Institute for Community College Instructors

May 29 - 30, 2020

**NOTE: The dates and logistics for this event are subject to possible change, depending on the course of the current COVID 19 pandemic. If you are interested in this event, sign up and you will get updates as the situation develops.**

How do we interpret narratives about mass movements in the past? And how does that understanding across the distance of time compare to the actual, complex experience of participating in such a movement?

The Global Rise of National Populism

Summer Institute for Community College Instructors

May 31 - June 1, 2019

Body & Identity

Summer Institute for k-12 Teachers

June 26 - 28, 2019

California's 2011 FAIR Education Act changed the state's education code to include the Fair, Accurate, Inclusive, and Respectful portrayal of the contributions and experiences of people with disabilities and people in the LGBT community in California and United States history and social studies courses. The 2019 ORIAS Summer Institute for k-12 teachers seeks to provide a global context within which to consider these topics.

Migration & Diaspora

Summer Institute for Community College Teachers

May 31 - June 2, 2018

The View from the Sea: Oceans in World History

Summer Institute for k-12 Educators

June 26 – 28, 2017

World History courses often begin with a survey of river-basin societies, exploring the connection between agricultural surplus, irrigation projects, and centralizing power. Oceans and seas are conceived of as places in between - natural regional boundaries traversed only by merchants and military forces.

But what are the contours of a different World History – one with a view from the sea?

Women in World History

How would your curriculum change if your default historical subjects were women, rather than men?

How would you assess the importance of the agricultural revolution or Athenian democracy? Would property rights and marriage laws edge out professional status and voting rights in classroom discussions about power? How would you construct narratives of long-distance trade, imperial conquest, and industrialization? Do you imagine the core periodization and themes underlying your course would be altered?

Environmental History

Summer Institute for Community College Educators

June 2 - 3, 2017